SUN AND WATER SAFETY

The sun in Australia may be quite hot, and it may be stronger than in your native country.

You may protect your skin by taking the following measures:

Before you go outside, check the weather prediction at www.bom.gov.au.

Before going outside, use sunscreen (such as SPF30+ water resistant sun lotion).

 

Apply sunscreen at least 25-30 minutes before going swimming, and be sure to reapply afterwards.

 

Wear a hat and sunglasses with UV protection.

 

Avoid spending time in direct sunlight between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when the sun is at its brightest.

 

Even if it isn't sunny, make sure you follow these guidelines since you can still become sunburnt on cloudy or overcast days.

There are many gorgeous beaches and streams in Australia, however swimming should be done with caution. Here are some safety guidelines for while you're in the water:

If you're not sure how deep the water is, don't get in.

 

Only swim at patrolled beaches (beach where lifeguards are on duty - check for signs) and always swim between the red and yellow flags so that lifeguards can see you.

There are rips on many Australian beaches. These are strong underwater currents that are difficult to see but may swiftly pull you away from the coast. You should be able to avoid rips if you swim between the flags. If you do get caught in a rip, try not to panic and swim against the current.

If you have a surfboard or other floating gadget, keep it with you. Swim out of the rip zone gently parallel to the shore, or wave for help from lifeguards or other swimmers and surfers.

 

Visit the Surf Life Saving website for further information on water safety.

 

Australia is a safe and inviting destination to live and study, frequently ranking among the world's safest countries.

 

However, it is still critical to take care of yourself and be aware of the hazards that exist - as well as measures to mitigate them. This is especially vital when you first arrive and are getting used to your new surroundings.

 

Whether dealing with crises, personal and home safety, or natural elements such as sun, water, and fire, following your common sense and best practises can keep you safe and healthy.